1070 William the Conqueror

1070

c1070

William the Conqueror mustered troops at Clarendon, the site was named in documents for the first time in the twelfth century. Romanesque style architecture, widespread use of local Hurdcott greensand, and Caen stone from Normandy.

1200 Gyrfalcon

1200

1200 c

Gyrfalcons brought to Clarendon for the king. These were the largest of the hunting birds, and were usually only used by royalty.

1176 Forestry

1176-1177

Dialogue of the Exchequer (Richard Fitz Nigel) evokes royal ‘separateness’ in use and exploitation of woodland, park and palace.

1179-80

Pipe Roll records the carriage of lead and paints (plumbo et coloribus) to Clarendon.

1164

Herbert of Bosham, present for the Constitutions meeting, describes Clarendon as ‘that noble and pre-eminent mansion, the king’s own, from its name and prominent position called Clarendon’.

There were perhaps 1800 people present for the meeting.

 

1166 Assize of Clarendon

1166

Assize of Clarendon established jury presentment in every community and vill.

1167 Turfing

1167-1168

‘turfing’ suggests garden works.

1170 Murder of Becket at Canterbury

1170

Archbishop Thomas Becket murdered in Canterbury cathedral.

1170s

digging and creation of the great Wine Cellar (La Roche), where 12C stonework still survives.

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