History

Look through our timeline to learn the history and story behind Clarendon Palace.

  • 1253 Queen's tiled floor

    Henry III ordered a new tiled floor for Queen Eleanor's (Eleanor of Provence) chamber.

    (Detail of tiles from complete floor display in the British Museum).

    1254

    Eleanor of Castile, later to become Edward I’s queen, arrived in England.

    Traditionally Spanish lustre ware is associated with her life in England, and  fragments of this were found in the spoil heaps.

     

    1255

    Christmas.

    Eighteen bream ‘as paste’ supplied from Marlborough.

    1263

    Nicholas Longespée, the king’s cousin, grandson of Henry II and a canon of Salisbury Cathedral, together with members of his household took game without royal warrant from Clarendon Park .

     

    1266-1272

    After the defeat of De Montfort at Lewes, Henry III enjoyed his declining years.

    Deliveries of wine increased at Clarendon.

    1267

    A stone wall was to be built around the king’s houses and the inner park below the palace, representing the still visible enceinte of the palace precinct.

     

    1268 Prison

    1268

    A prison ordered to be made at the palace, probably by the West Gate.

    An ‘outer chamber for the use of the king’s esquires’ is mentioned and also built.

    1272

    Henry III died.

    Palace and park surveyed; palace in poor repair; park ‘badly enclosed’.

     

    1272-1307

    Reign of Edward I.

    1272-3

    Survey of palace and park records multiple defects.

    1273

    Works include ‘the setting of plants in the king’s garden at Clarendon’.

    1276

    Edward I orders ‘clearings’ (trenchia) to be made in Clarendon Park.

    1307-1327 Edward II

    1307-1327

    Reign of Edward II

    A new Chancery was built.

    A parliament held.

    1311

    A court hears of ‘the forcible entry of the king’s manor of Clarendon by Robert de Micheldever [deputy warden] and others, carrying away timber, stones, iron, lead and other goods’.

    1314

    In February, large gangs of men including members of the household of the king’s enemy the Earl of Lancaster, enter Clarendon Forest with bows, arrows, dogs, cords and snares.

    1314-1316 Great famine

    1314-1316

    The Great Famine.

    1317

    Edward II makes a lengthy visit, from 2 February-13 April.

    1317

    Edward II enlarged the park.

    Perhaps following his first recorded visit in February that year.

    At 1737ha (4292 acres) it was the largest park in medieval England, and about the size of the park today.

    1318-1324

    Potters given access to brushwood (for firing kilns) on west side of the park.

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